Quick Sautéed Hen of the woods Recipe

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Hen of the Woods(Grifola frondosa) also goes by another name. “Maitake” means “to dancing” in Japanese. It is said that the mushroom takes its name from people who have happily danced to find it in the wild.
The Mushroom grows wild in parts of Japan, China and North America. It grows in the depths of oak, elm and maple. It can even be grown at home, although it does not usually grow as well as it does in the wild. Normally, the fungus can be found during the autumn months.
Although the maitake mushroom has been used in Japan and China for thousands of years, it has only gained popularity in the US over the past twenty years. People praise this mushroom for its promise of health, vitality and longevity. You can read more in our article about hen of the woods mushroom.

Health benefits
Compared to other mushrooms, Maitake has shown great results in the prevention and treatment of cancer and other health problems. Maitake also has a positive effect on overall immunity.
This Mushrooms is a kind of adaptogen. Adaptogens help the body to fight any mental or physical difficulties. They also work on the regulation of unbalanced body systems. Although this mushroom is commonly used for flavor in recipes, it is also considered a medicinal mushroom.

Maitake mushrooms are rich in:
antioxidants
beta-glucans
Vitamins B and C
copper
potassium
fiber
minerals
amino acids
Scientists are currently investigating the unique way in which the fungus promotes overall health and combats disease.

Ingredients
1 pound, hen of the woods, mushrooms
3 tablespoons coconut oil
2 onion, sliced thin
1 teaspoon garlic powder
¼ cup dry white wine
2 teaspoons chopped mixed herbs like rosemary, sage, thyme, and marjoram are all great with mushrooms
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper
½ cup Italian parsley leaves, chopped

Method
1. Thoroughly clean mushrooms.
2. Cut and discard all hard parts.
3. Cut the mushrooms from 1/8 “to 1/4” thick.
4. Heat the coconut oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the chopped onion, cook for 1 minute and add the hen of the woods mushrooms.
5. Cook with constant stirring for 8 to 10 minutes, until the mushrooms have released their juice and brown.
6. Add the garlic powder and white wine, increase the heat and simmer for another 2 minutes until the wine has completely evaporated.
7. Mix the herbs; Mix well and taste. Add parsley and serve.



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Serviceberry Muffins

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Serviceberry is an interesting plant, it not only looks like blueberries but it also has a similar taste. These are from the rose family and often go by the name of Amelanchier. That is not the only name they are recognized by however, you can also find them labeled as June Berry, Shadblow Berry, Shadbush Berry, Saskatoon Berry , Sarvis Berry, Chuckle Pear and Shadwood.

Serviceberries are delicious. You could make a pie, breakfast muffins or just eat it raw. Today we would like to make a set of delicious muffin. These tasty muffins go well with a nice cup of coffee or it can be eaten as a dessert after dinner. This recipe makes 8 large muffins, if you wish to make more, you can double the recipe.

Not, familiar with ServiceBerries? Take a look at our article about serviceberry trees(Genus:Amelanchier) to learn more about this delicious plant.

 

Ingredients

1 ½ cups of all-purpose flour

¾ cup of granulated sugar, plus 1 tablespoon for muffin tops

½ tsp of kosher salt

2 tsp of baking powder

⅓ cup of vegetable oil

1 large egg

⅓ – ½ cup of milk; dairy and non-dairy both work

1 ½ tsp of vanilla extract

1 cup of fresh or frozen Serviceberries

½ tsp of ground nutmeg

 

Instructions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (204 degrees Celsius).

Using a muffin sheet, line 8 cups with muffin cups.

In a large bowl mix all the dry ingredients (baking powder, nutmeg, flour and salt) together and put to the side.

In a smaller bowl mix all the wet ingredients ( egg, vanilla, milk, and oil) together.

Slowly pour the wet ingredients into the large bowl with the dry ingredients and stir slowly.

Once batter is mix together with a smooth appearance, add the ServiceBerries and gently mix them into the batter.

Once everything is incorporated into the large bowl use a ½ cup measuring cup to scoop the batter into the muffin tray.

If you have one or two muffin cups that does not have any batter, pour some water into it when you place it in the oven.

Lightly sprinkle sugar on the top of each muffin.

Bake muffins 15 to 20 minutes or until tops are no longer wet and a toothpick inserted into the middle of a muffin comes out with crumbs, not wet batter.

When muffins are complete, transfer them to a cooling rack and enjoy!



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Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

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Garlic Lamb’s Quarters Recipe

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Lamb quarters is a very important crop in northern India but in the USA it is often seen as a weed. This leafy vegetable comes from the Amaranthaceae family and a common name that it also goes by is goosefeet. Occasionally people may call it pigweed, however pigweed is a different plant and has several varieties that are edible. Lamb quarters has a similar taste and consistency to that of spinach; it goes well with salads, steamed vegetables and/or a nice piece of steak.

This leafy vegetable can be cooked by steaming or simply by stir frying it with other vegetables. Garlic is a nice complimentary flavor that goes well with a little bit of salt to pack it with extra flavor. If you have never heard about Lamb Quarters, check out our article all about lamb’s quarters.

A word of caution should be kept in mind when eating this edible plant, when eating raw please eat in moderation since this plant has high amount of oxalic acid just like other familiar plants such as spinach. Oxalic acid can aggravate some conditions such as kidney stones.

Ingredients
½ lemon ( you will need the juice from this)
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tbsp unsalted butter
10 ounces of fresh Lamb’s Quarters ( Washed and patted dry)
4 cloves of garlic ( thinly sliced)
salt and pepper to taste

Instructions
1) Over medium heat, place a saucepan and heat butter until it has fully melted.
2) Add garlic and cook until fragrant approx. 2 minutes.
3) Add Lamb’s quarters a handful at a time and stir gently.
4) When the lamb’s quarters appear to have wilted add the lemon juice and garlic powder.
5) Stir gently.
6) Add salt and black pepper to taste.
7) Serve with your favorite steak or eat it as a main course.
8) Enjoy!



Featured Videos - eattheplanet.org

Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



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Read more.
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