Tangy Sorrel Salad Recipe

eattheplanet.org is an affiliate marketer. We may earn commission from links to products and services on this page.

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg


Are you ready to start making another unique dish? Have you ever heard of sheep’s sorrel or wood sorrel? Both of these have a bit of a tangy flavor to them giving any salad a little zing! Wood sorrel looks very similar to a four leaf clover. For more information on identification of wood sorrel see our article on wood sorrel. Sheep sorrel also has a very unique leaf shape. For more information on identification of sheep sorrel see our article on sheep sorrel. Both of these little jewels are filled with Vitamin C and other great benefits for your body.

I love when my salads have a bit of tang to them, so that’s exactly what are going to do. Salads made with lettuce, tomato and you guessed it, wood sorrel or sheep sorrel are some of the most delicious and nutritious side dishes that I’ve had in a long time. Seeing how a good salad can be the main part of a dish or just a side, we want to show you a different way to approach your salad using these tangy plants.

Ingredients
1 Large and juicy tomato (thinly sliced)
4 Tbsp of Olive oil
Maldon ( a type of flaky salt)
Black pepper
2 cups of sheep sorrel leaves(wood sorrel can be added but it’s difficult to get in significant quantities)
3 cups of lettuce (roughly chopped )
¼ cup of thyme (roughly chopped )
¼ cup of parsley
¼ cup of chive (roughly chopped )
¼ cup of Basil

Instructions
1) In a large salad bowl place tomato along with 3 tbsp of olive oil, ½ salt and ¼ black pepper and let sit.
2) Using your hands, pull apart the basil and parsley and place in the large salad bowl
3) Add lettuce, wood sorrel, thyme and parsley to the bowl and toss.
4) Sprinkle the remaining olive oil onto the salad
5) Toss, salt and pepper to taste
6) Serve and enjoy



Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



Sassafras albidum leaf shapes
Sassafras, An Illegal Substance That Grows Wild In Our Back Yards
Read more.
Sassafras albidum
What is the story behind the banning of Safrole?
Read more.
Juniperus virginiana young tree shape
Eastern Red Cedar Berries, A Touch of Natural Flavor
Read more.
Trametes versicolor, Turkey Tail Mushroom
Turkey Tail, A Powerful Medicinal Mushroom
Read more.
Allium vineale, Wild Garlic
Wild Garlic, A Great Addition to Foraged Meals
Read more.
Nyssa sylvatica, Black Tupelo, notice brances growing out at 90 degrees then sloping down
Black Tupelo, A Native American Fruit Tree
Read more.
Berberis thunbergii, Japanese Barberry fruits and leaves
Japanese Barberry, Invasive Winter Fruit
Read more.
Elaeagnus umbellata, Autumn Olive fruit
Autumn Olive, A Common Invasive Edible Fruit
Read more.
Prunus avium, Sweet Cherry leaves and fruit
Wild Cherry Tree, A Native American Necessity
Read more.
Field Cricket
Crickets, An Abundant Source of Protein Worldwide
Read more.

A Spicy Bittercress Sautée

eattheplanet.org is an affiliate marketer. We may earn commission from links to products and services on this page.

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg


Bittercress is a delicious substitute for lettuce or spinach that can be found in your yard. It’s scientific name is Cardamine Hirsuta, which refers to the name Hairy Bittercress. Despite it being called bittercress, it’s not bitter at all instead it has a rich tangy yet spicy flavor. Whether served raw or cooked; it’s definitely a great addition to your diet. You can read more about bittercress in our Article about this prolific plant.

Bittercress can be eaten in a fresh salad but for this recipe, we are going to sautee it with some garlic and onion with red crushed chili flakes. This recipe is simple and easy to make, a great side dish for any occasion.

Ingredients

2 tsp Olive oil
1 bunch of Bittercress, trimmed and cleaned
½ tsp of Red crushed chili flakes
1 small onion, minced
3 cloves of garlic, minced
kosher salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

1) Heat oil in a medium saucepan or wok over low heat, then add onion, garlic and red crushed chili flakes and cook until the aroma fills the kitchen.
2) Once onions are translucent, add the Bittercress and slowly raise the heat to medium.
3) Stir until Bittercress starts to wilt then add salt to taste
4) Serve in a dish next to your choice of meat or vegetables.
5) Enjoy your hard work!



Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



Sassafras albidum leaf shapes
Sassafras, An Illegal Substance That Grows Wild In Our Back Yards
Read more.
Sassafras albidum
What is the story behind the banning of Safrole?
Read more.
Juniperus virginiana young tree shape
Eastern Red Cedar Berries, A Touch of Natural Flavor
Read more.
Trametes versicolor, Turkey Tail Mushroom
Turkey Tail, A Powerful Medicinal Mushroom
Read more.
Allium vineale, Wild Garlic
Wild Garlic, A Great Addition to Foraged Meals
Read more.
Nyssa sylvatica, Black Tupelo, notice brances growing out at 90 degrees then sloping down
Black Tupelo, A Native American Fruit Tree
Read more.
Berberis thunbergii, Japanese Barberry fruits and leaves
Japanese Barberry, Invasive Winter Fruit
Read more.
Elaeagnus umbellata, Autumn Olive fruit
Autumn Olive, A Common Invasive Edible Fruit
Read more.
Prunus avium, Sweet Cherry leaves and fruit
Wild Cherry Tree, A Native American Necessity
Read more.
Field Cricket
Crickets, An Abundant Source of Protein Worldwide
Read more.

Rose of Sharon Buds Sautéed with Onion and Garlic

eattheplanet.org is an affiliate marketer. We may earn commission from links to products and services on this page.

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



Rose of Sharon comes in many colors, not only is it a beautiful plant but it is also an edible plant. Every part of this incredible organism is edible; from the roots to the buds. While you may find this strange, the rose of Sharon has a long history of being an antioxidant. Today we’ll be making a side dish using the buds. For more information on rose of sharon see our Article on this beautiful wild edible.

Now if you have never eaten them before you may think of them having the consistency of okra, however the flowers themselves have the same texture as lettuce with a refreshing taste when you bite into it. One of the simplest ways to prepare the buds is making a simple sautée with onions and garlic. You may choose to use wild onions and garlic which has a more pungent taste but you don’t have to.

Ingredients
¼ pound of Rose of Sharon buds
1 small onion (minced) ( If you don’t have onions, shallots are a great substitute)
1 clove of garlic (minced)
2 tsp oil ( use your preferred oil here)
Salt
Pepper
Optional: grape tomatoes

Instructions:
To prepare the buds for eating, wash and pat them dry.

Cut off the top of the bud like you would an okra.

Over medium heat place a medium saucepan.

Now pour the oil into the pan and let it heat up.

Add the onions and garlic, cook 1-2 minutes until they are fragrant.

Add the buds and stir.

Salt and pepper to taste

When buds have become tender, remove from heat and serve on a plate.

Enjoy !

 



Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



Sassafras albidum leaf shapes
Sassafras, An Illegal Substance That Grows Wild In Our Back Yards
Read more.
Sassafras albidum
What is the story behind the banning of Safrole?
Read more.
Juniperus virginiana young tree shape
Eastern Red Cedar Berries, A Touch of Natural Flavor
Read more.
Trametes versicolor, Turkey Tail Mushroom
Turkey Tail, A Powerful Medicinal Mushroom
Read more.
Allium vineale, Wild Garlic
Wild Garlic, A Great Addition to Foraged Meals
Read more.
Nyssa sylvatica, Black Tupelo, notice brances growing out at 90 degrees then sloping down
Black Tupelo, A Native American Fruit Tree
Read more.
Berberis thunbergii, Japanese Barberry fruits and leaves
Japanese Barberry, Invasive Winter Fruit
Read more.
Elaeagnus umbellata, Autumn Olive fruit
Autumn Olive, A Common Invasive Edible Fruit
Read more.
Prunus avium, Sweet Cherry leaves and fruit
Wild Cherry Tree, A Native American Necessity
Read more.
Field Cricket
Crickets, An Abundant Source of Protein Worldwide
Read more.