Lion’s Mane Mushroom Recipe

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Lion’s mane mushroom strictly refers to Hericium erinaceus but other members of the genus Hericium are very similar and can be identified and used in the same ways. This is a genus of edible mushrooms that also have medicinal properties. These mushrooms are easy to identify and have a great unique flavor. Mushrooms in the genus Hericium are sometimes hard to find but they grow in much of north america and the world so it’s beneficial for all of us to be familiar with this unique genus. You can read more in our article featuring lion’s mane mushroom.

Improves digestive health
The plant has proven to be very useful in promoting digestive health. It allows the stomach and liver to function properly. It also protects the liver. It is effective against chronic gastritis, duodenal ulcers and gastric ulcers. Many patients have used it to relieve mental apathy (also called neurasthenia). Its use as a fortifying tonic for health has also paid off.

Useful as a dietary supplement
Today, the fungus shows its effectiveness in clinical use. Doctors recommend it as a dietary supplement. The reason is the positive effect on mood, brain health and memory. Scientific studies have shown that the fungus can increase neurotrophic activity. Stimulates the growth of nerve or brain cells, thereby increasing neurotrophic activity. This effect improves your reputation as a cerebral stimulant and antidepressant.

Reduces bad cholesterol and increases good cholesterol

Lion’s Mane Mushroom is known not only for medical purposes but also for lowering cholesterol. A unique and submerged fungal culture lowers cholesterol by about 32%. The same culture lowers LDL cholesterol by about 45.4%. It also reduces triglycerides by up to 34.3%. More importantly, it increases HDL cholesterol by about 31%, which is good cholesterol. Eliminate the bad and increase the good cholesterol.

The other health benefits of Lion’s Mane Mushroom include:
anticancer effects
treating ulcers
decreasing the levels of serum glucose while increasing serum insulin levels
healing wounds

Ingredients
1 cup chopped Lion’s mane mushrooms
1 tablespoon coconut oil
½ teaspoon garlic powder
salt and pepper

Method

1. Heat the coconut oil over medium heat in a small pan.
2. Once the coconut oil is warmed up, add the garlic powder and cook for 1 to 2 minutes.
3. Put the chopped Lion’s mane mushrooms in the pan and start cooking. The oil can be absorbed quickly by the mushrooms, that’s fine, do not add oil.
4. Season with salt and pepper, turn occasionally and stir to make sure all sides are cooked. Cook for about 10 minutes.
5. Enjoy



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