Garlic Lamb’s Quarters Recipe


Lamb quarters is a very important crop in northern India but in the USA it is often seen as a weed. This leafy vegetable comes from the Amaranthaceae family and a common name that it also goes by is goosefeet. Occasionally people may call it pigweed, however pigweed is a different plant and has several varieties that are edible. Lamb quarters has a similar taste and consistency to that of spinach; it goes well with salads, steamed vegetables and/or a nice piece of steak.

This leafy vegetable can be cooked by steaming or simply by stir frying it with other vegetables. Garlic is a nice complimentary flavor that goes well with a little bit of salt to pack it with extra flavor. If you have never heard about Lamb Quarters, check out our article all about lamb’s quarters.

A word of caution should be kept in mind when eating this edible plant, when eating raw please eat in moderation since this plant has high amount of oxalic acid just like other familiar plants such as spinach. Oxalic acid can aggravate some conditions such as kidney stones.

Ingredients
½ lemon ( you will need the juice from this)
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tbsp unsalted butter
10 ounces of fresh Lamb’s Quarters ( Washed and patted dry)
4 cloves of garlic ( thinly sliced)
salt and pepper to taste

Instructions
1) Over medium heat, place a saucepan and heat butter until it has fully melted.
2) Add garlic and cook until fragrant approx. 2 minutes.
3) Add Lamb’s quarters a handful at a time and stir gently.
4) When the lamb’s quarters appear to have wilted add the lemon juice and garlic powder.
5) Stir gently.
6) Add salt and black pepper to taste.
7) Serve with your favorite steak or eat it as a main course.
8) Enjoy!



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