Portuguese Purslane Soup

eattheplanet.org is an affiliate marketer. We may earn commission from links to products and services on this page.

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



Also known as Little Hogweed, Purslane(Portulaca oleracea ) is a very common edible weed. It can be found throughout the US and Canada as well as other parts of the world. Purslane can be found growing in sunny areas. The plant can be identified by its thick succulent-like leaves. All above ground parts of Purslane can be eaten: stems, leaves, flowers, buds, and seeds. Those parts can be consumed in almost every way you can imagine, raw or cooked, in a salad or in a sandwich. To read more about the Purslane plant, read our article Purslane, A Wild Edible Weed with Many Culinary Uses.

Health Benefits
Purslane can be a great addition to your daily diet. It’s packed with more omega-3 fatty acids than other the vast majority of other plants. It also contains a lot of essential vitamins and minerals. However, while it’s certainly a healthy ingredient, please be aware that Purslane contains oxalate. Oxalate has been linked to kidney stones. Consult a doctor before consuming vegetables with high oxalate content, such as Purslane and spinach.

Ingredients(Makes 6-7 cups)
½ cup Purslane leaves
6 cups hot water
1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons white wine
1 carrot, peeled and chopped
1 onion, roughly chopped
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
3 medium or large potatoes, peeled and halved
40g chourico, sliced
1/3 cup parboiled variety of rice
3 teaspoons coarse or sea salt
2 teaspoons pepper
juice from ½ lemon
½ teaspoon freshly ground cinnamon
10 fresh mint leaves (for serving)

Directions
In a large pot, heat butter and olive oil. Add in chopped onions and sauté until they’re softened and golden in color. Add in chourico and carrot, continue to sauté until fragrant. Then add in garlic and continue cooking until the garlic becomes fragrant.

Pour in the white wine and cook until almost completely evaporated. Add in the potatoes and season with salt and pepper. Toss and sauté for a couple more minutes.

Add in 6 cups of hot water and bring to a boil. Slightly lower the heat and cover the pot. Let the soup simmer on high for 20 minutes or so. Remove soup from heat.

Scoop out the potatoes and chourico slices, place them in separate bowls. Mash the potatoes roughly and set aside. Meanwhile, pour the soup into a blender or food processor and purée until completely smooth. Then, pour the soup back into the pot.

Add rice to the pot and boil. Using a wooden spoon, stir so the rice doesn’t stick. Cover the pot and let simmer for 10 minutes. Uncover, then add purslane and mashed potatoes. Bring to a boil and let simmer uncovered for 10 more minutes, or until the rice is just cooked. Stir occasionally. Lastly, add in cinnamon and the lemon juice. Stir until thoroughly mixed.

Remove from heat and scoop soup into bowls. Garnish with mint leaves on top and serve while hot.

 



Featured Videos - eattheplanet.org


Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



There are over 150,000 Edible plants
OVER 150,000 EDIBLE PLANTS
Read more.
Japanese Knotweed
5 Easy to Forage Edible Spring Plants of the Northeast
Read more.
Rosa multiflora
Multiflora Rose, An Invasive But Nutritious Wild Edible
Read more.
Pinus Strobus Eastern White Pine
Eastern White Pine, An Effective Remedy For The Common Cold
Read more.
Pinus Strobus Eastern White Pine
What Is The Opposite Of “Conifer”
Read more.
What Is The Opposite Of “Conifer” ANSWER
Read more.
Elaeagnus umbellata, Autumn Olive fruit
10 Wild Edibles, You Should Know
Read more.
Quercus rubra acorns
Oak Tree Acorns, A High Calorie Wild Edible
Read more.
Tsuga Canadensis needles and cones
Canadian Hemlock, A Hot Winter Tea
Read more.
Native American Smoking A Pipe
Surprisingly, Smoking Tobacco From A Pipe May Have Health Benefits
Read more.

Chicory Root Tea Recipe With Cinnamon

eattheplanet.org is an affiliate marketer. We may earn commission from links to products and services on this page.

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



Chicory (Cichorium intybus) is a perennial herb plant. It can easily be recognized from its bright blue flowers and its dandelion-like leaves. Chicory is native to Europe, but it’s now commonly found across the US and Canada. All parts of the Chicory plant are edible. The leaves can be eaten raw or cooked and the flowers can be used as an edible salad garnish. Even the stems and roots can be used to make tea. However, Chicory tastes very bitter and it may help to blanch the root in water before consumption to help remove the bitter taste. To read more about the Chicory plant, see our article Chicory, Street Side Salad Greens and Tea.

Health Benefits
Chicory leaf or root tea is loaded with vitamins and minerals. It contains dietary fiber, vitamin A, B, C, E, K, and multiple minerals. It can be a great alternative to sugary or carbonated drinks. Without further ado, let’s move on to our Chicory tea recipe.

Ingredients (Makes 1 Cup)
2 tablespoons ground or chopped Chicory root
1 cup water
1 cinnamon stick (whole, not powdered)
1 tablespoon coconut oil
1 tablespoon honey or sweetener of your choice (optional)

Directions
Boil the water in a sauce pan.

In a tea kettle, put in Chicory root and the cinnamon stick. Pour the boiling water into the tea kettle. Cover the kettle and let the tea steep for 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the cinnamon stick, then pour the tea into a blender along with the coconut oil. Blend the tea and oil on high for 15 to 30 seconds. Alternatively you can just strain out the chunks of root with a cheese cloth.

Pour the tea into a cup. Add in honey or other sweeteners of your choice, if you wish. Serve and enjoy while warm.



Featured Videos - eattheplanet.org


Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



There are over 150,000 Edible plants
OVER 150,000 EDIBLE PLANTS
Read more.
Japanese Knotweed
5 Easy to Forage Edible Spring Plants of the Northeast
Read more.
Rosa multiflora
Multiflora Rose, An Invasive But Nutritious Wild Edible
Read more.
Pinus Strobus Eastern White Pine
Eastern White Pine, An Effective Remedy For The Common Cold
Read more.
Pinus Strobus Eastern White Pine
What Is The Opposite Of “Conifer”
Read more.
What Is The Opposite Of “Conifer” ANSWER
Read more.
Elaeagnus umbellata, Autumn Olive fruit
10 Wild Edibles, You Should Know
Read more.
Quercus rubra acorns
Oak Tree Acorns, A High Calorie Wild Edible
Read more.
Tsuga Canadensis needles and cones
Canadian Hemlock, A Hot Winter Tea
Read more.
Native American Smoking A Pipe
Surprisingly, Smoking Tobacco From A Pipe May Have Health Benefits
Read more.

Hen of the Woods – Powerful Medicinal and Edible Mushroom

eattheplanet.org is an affiliate marketer. We may earn commission from links to products and services on this page.

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg


Hen of the Woods
Hen of the Woods (Grifola frondosa) – (Photo by: By Keith Miklas / Wikimedia Commons)

Hen of the woods (Grifola frondosa) which is also called maitake mushroom is one of the most, if not the most commonly foraged mushrooms in the northeastern United States. Hen of the Woods is native to both the United states and Japan and has traditionally been used as an edible and medicinal mushroom in Japan. I have not found any  literature stating specifically that hen of the woods was a common native american food but given all the benefits, my hunch is that it was.  Hen of the woods is a mushroom that beginners can learn to identify relatively easily. It also can get very large and it is perennial which means that it reappears in the same spot year after year. Its delicious and an extremely healthy option to add to your diet. To help you remember this mushroom, there are 3 beginner mushrooms that are named after fowl, this is one of them, the other two are chicken of the woods and turkey tail.

Edibility and Culinary Use

Hen of the Woods mushrooms can be cooked in the same way as other popular culinary mushrooms such as shiitake and white button mushrooms. The difference is in the preparation. Mature hen of the woods mushrooms can have a tough base which may need to be discarded if it can’t be easily chewed. The softer outer edges of the hen of the woods can be pulled apart instead of cut to preserve the unique texture of the mushroom. Hen of the woods has a mild mushroom flavor that goes well with almost anything and isn’t overpowering. Here is a quick saute hen of the woods recipe.

Health Benefits

Hen of the woods is well known for its many health benefits. Maitake mushroom extract pills and maitake mushroom extract liquid are both commonly used for the many health benefits of Maitake/Hen of the woods. One of the keys to the powerful health benefits that hen of the woods offers is a compound called beta-glucans that can be found in hen of the woods. Beta-glucans is well known in the medical industry as a stimulant to boost the immune system. It is used in the treatment of HIV and other immune suppressing conditions. Hen of the woods also has known cancer fighting properties, likely also due to beta-glucans. There are a host of other claims of health benefits including lowering blood sugar and lowering cholesterol.

Cautions

The only cautions here are correct identification. There are no notorious poisonous look a likes but its still always important to identify mushrooms to an extremely high degree of certainty if you plan to eat them.

Key ID Features

Hen of the Woods
Hen of the Woods (Grifola frondosa) – (Photo by: Pethan / Wikimedia Commons)

Hen of the woods commonly grows at the base of oak trees in late summer or early fall. One of the first things to look for when identifying any mushroom is weather it’s a polypore like chicken of the woods and turkey tail or weather it’s a gilled mushroom like shiitake. Hen of the woods(maitake) mushroom is a polypore which means that underneath the mushroom’s cap is a finely porous sponge-like surface and not mushroom gills.  Another primary identification characteristic is the bunching growth pattern of the maitake mushroom seen in the photo to the right. Also keep in mind that the color can vary. Most commonly the top of the mushroom caps will be grey or brown but can also be lighter colors including shades of tan or beige. The underside is always white.

One mushroom that may be confused with hen of the woods is black staining polypore. There are some differences in growth pattern and coloration including the black staining coloration of the black staining polypore. The good news is that black staining polypore is also edible but for the sake of improving your familiarity with specific mushroom species it’s always recommended to focus on correct identification.

Conclusion

The reasons why hen of the woods is one of the most commonly foraged mushrooms is clear. It’s perennial, easy to identify and great tasting. It has a long history of being a culinary and medicinal mushroom in Japan and Korea. This is one of the first wild mushrooms I’ve ever tried. If you find a clump of hen of the woods remember to return annually in early fall to harvest.

Hen of the Woods
Hen of the Woods (Grifola frondosa) – (Photo by: Davepd19 / Wikimedia Commons)
Hen of the Woods
Hen of the Woods (Grifola frondosa) – (Photo by: E.Scholle / Wikimedia Commons)


Featured Videos - eattheplanet.org


Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



There are over 150,000 Edible plants
OVER 150,000 EDIBLE PLANTS
Read more.
Japanese Knotweed
5 Easy to Forage Edible Spring Plants of the Northeast
Read more.
Rosa multiflora
Multiflora Rose, An Invasive But Nutritious Wild Edible
Read more.
Pinus Strobus Eastern White Pine
Eastern White Pine, An Effective Remedy For The Common Cold
Read more.
Pinus Strobus Eastern White Pine
What Is The Opposite Of “Conifer”
Read more.
What Is The Opposite Of “Conifer” ANSWER
Read more.
Elaeagnus umbellata, Autumn Olive fruit
10 Wild Edibles, You Should Know
Read more.
Quercus rubra acorns
Oak Tree Acorns, A High Calorie Wild Edible
Read more.
Tsuga Canadensis needles and cones
Canadian Hemlock, A Hot Winter Tea
Read more.
Native American Smoking A Pipe
Surprisingly, Smoking Tobacco From A Pipe May Have Health Benefits
Read more.