A Spicy Bittercress Sautée

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Bittercress is a delicious substitute for lettuce or spinach that can be found in your yard. It’s scientific name is Cardamine Hirsuta, which refers to the name Hairy Bittercress. Despite it being called bittercress, it’s not bitter at all instead it has a rich tangy yet spicy flavor. Whether served raw or cooked; it’s definitely a great addition to your diet. You can read more about bittercress in our Article about this prolific plant.

Bittercress can be eaten in a fresh salad but for this recipe, we are going to sautee it with some garlic and onion with red crushed chili flakes. This recipe is simple and easy to make, a great side dish for any occasion.

Ingredients

2 tsp Olive oil
1 bunch of Bittercress, trimmed and cleaned
½ tsp of Red crushed chili flakes
1 small onion, minced
3 cloves of garlic, minced
kosher salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

1) Heat oil in a medium saucepan or wok over low heat, then add onion, garlic and red crushed chili flakes and cook until the aroma fills the kitchen.
2) Once onions are translucent, add the Bittercress and slowly raise the heat to medium.
3) Stir until Bittercress starts to wilt then add salt to taste
4) Serve in a dish next to your choice of meat or vegetables.
5) Enjoy your hard work!



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Rose of Sharon Buds Sautéed with Onion and Garlic

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Rose of Sharon comes in many colors, not only is it a beautiful plant but it is also an edible plant. Every part of this incredible organism is edible; from the roots to the buds. While you may find this strange, the rose of Sharon has a long history of being an antioxidant. Today we’ll be making a side dish using the buds. For more information on rose of sharon see our Article on this beautiful wild edible.

Now if you have never eaten them before you may think of them having the consistency of okra, however the flowers themselves have the same texture as lettuce with a refreshing taste when you bite into it. One of the simplest ways to prepare the buds is making a simple sautée with onions and garlic. You may choose to use wild onions and garlic which has a more pungent taste but you don’t have to.

Ingredients
¼ pound of Rose of Sharon buds
1 small onion (minced) ( If you don’t have onions, shallots are a great substitute)
1 clove of garlic (minced)
2 tsp oil ( use your preferred oil here)
Salt
Pepper
Optional: grape tomatoes

Instructions:
To prepare the buds for eating, wash and pat them dry.

Cut off the top of the bud like you would an okra.

Over medium heat place a medium saucepan.

Now pour the oil into the pan and let it heat up.

Add the onions and garlic, cook 1-2 minutes until they are fragrant.

Add the buds and stir.

Salt and pepper to taste

When buds have become tender, remove from heat and serve on a plate.

Enjoy !

 



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Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



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Crispy Roasted Crickets

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Crickets are a common insect found in almost every area around the world. While it may be seen as odd in the West, crickets are a normal snack food for a lot of people, especially in Asia and Africa. Like other insects, crickets are a wonderful source of protein. Crickets are high in protein yet low in fat and bad cholesterols. If you want a healthy and filling snack, crickets might just be your newest favorite. To read more about crickets, read our article Crickets, An Abundant Source of Protein Worldwide.

How do crickets taste?
You might be skeptical when it comes to eating crickets. What if it tastes bad? Well, don’t worry. Crickets taste delicious. It has a nutty flavor with no bad aftertastes. Crickets also absorb the herbs and spices it’s cooked in, making it a versatile ingredient. Crickets can be fried, roasted, baked, or boiled, they taste good either way. Note that crickets should always be cooked thoroughly before consumption since they may contain harmful parasites.

Ingredients
25-50 crickets (or any amount you wish to serve).  You can freeze the crickets first to immobilize and kill them if you’d like.

Kosher salt for seasoning. Other optional seasonings include garlic powder, black pepper, and cayenne pepper.

 

Directions

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Preheat the oven to 200 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or buttered/oiled tin foil.
Place the crickets on the lined baking sheet. Make sure they don’t overlap each other. Put the baking sheet in the oven and bake the crickets for 45 to 60 minutes, or until dry and crispy enough for your personal taste.

To check if the crickets are crisp enough, take out the baking sheet at around the 45-minute mark. Take one cricket and try to crush it with your fingers. The cricket should crumble easily. If the cricket is still not crispy enough for you, bake them a bit longer.

Once roasted to your preference, take the crickets out of the oven and let them sit to cool down.
Clean the crickets by taking a few of them and placing them between your palms. Carefully roll the crickets around. The legs and antennae should break off. Continue doing this with the rest of the crickets.

Sprinkle salt onto the crickets and give them a toss to make sure the crickets are thoroughly seasoned. Serve the crickets or store them in an air-tight container for later.

 



Featured Videos - eattheplanet.org

Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

Follow us on Twitter @EatThePlanetOrg



Prunus avium, Sweet Cherry leaves and fruit
Wild Cherry Tree, A Native American Necessity
Read more.
Field Cricket
Crickets, An Abundant Source of Protein Worldwide
Read more.
Amaranthus retroflexus, Common Amaranth leaves and flower seed stalks
Amaranth, A Weed Here, A Staple Food Everywhere Else
Read more.
Mission Statement
Read more.
Linden Tree, Tilia cordata, Small leaved Linden leaves and flower bunches
Linden Tree – Abundant Edible Leaves and Flowers
Read more.
USDA Hardiness Zone Map 1990
US Department of Agriculture(USDA) Hardiness Zones
Read more.
Cornus kousa, Kousa Dogwood Fruits
Kousa Dogwood Fruit, Tropical Flavor in Temperate Climates
Read more.
Cichorium intybus, Chicory
Chicory, Street Side Salad Greens and Tea
Read more.
PPortulaca oleracea, Purslane Leaves and Flowers
Purslane, A Wild Edible Weed With Many Culinary Uses
Read more.
Rhus typhina, Staghorn Sumac fruit cluster
Sumac, Indian Lemonade
Read more.