Acorn Pancakes Recipe

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Oak Trees(Genus: Acer) are evergreen, broad-leaved trees that grow all over the world. The Oak Trees’ acorns are a staple food for Native American tribes and other indigenous tribes all around the world. These acorns are very common and plentiful, especially in the fall. Acorns are a great wild edible since they’re packed with calories from healthy fats. To read more about the Oak Tree Acorns, read our article Oak Tree Acorns, A High Calorie Wild Edible.

Collecting Acorns
Before we move on to the recipe, you should know that some acorn species can taste awfully bitter. This is because different species contain different levels of tannin. Get rid of the tannin by peeling the acorns, mashing them, then washing them continuously in cold water. Also, if you’re foraging acorns that have fallen on the ground, you might want to keep an eye out for weevil grubs. They are harmless and safe to eat, but most people get squeamish about them so take a look inside when you break open the acorns.

Ingredients (Makes 6-8 pancakes)
1 cup wheat flour
¼ cup acorn grits (leached, cooked, and drained)
1 large egg
¾ cup milk
¼ teaspoon salt
¾ teaspoon baking powder
1 tablespoon brown sugar
½ tablespoon oil
¾ teaspoon orange zest

Directions
To make syrup: combine butter and maple syrup in a small saucepan. Heat over medium-low heat until the butter is melted. Stir well to combine. Remove from heat and set aside for later.

To make pancakes: grease a skillet or a griddle using butter or non-stick cooking spray. Warm skillet over medium heat.

In a bowl, combine wheat flour, salt, and baking soda. This is your dry ingredients mixture.

In another bowl, whisk the egg along with the milk until well-combined. Then, add in acorn grits, sugar, oil, and orange zest. This is your wet ingredients mixture.

Gradually pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients while stirring constantly. Don’t overmix the batter. The batter should still be slightly lumpy but well-mixed.

Using a ladle, scoop pancake batter onto your skillet. Make sure to leave enough room around the pancake so you can flip it later.

Let the pancake cook until bubbles form on the top. Flip and let cook for another 2 minutes. If one side of the pancake looks too dark, turn down the heat.

Continue with the rest of the batter.

Stack pancakes on a serving plate. Drizzle with syrup and serve immediately.



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Portuguese Purslane Soup

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Also known as Little Hogweed, Purslane(Portulaca oleracea ) is a very common edible weed. It can be found throughout the US and Canada as well as other parts of the world. Purslane can be found growing in sunny areas. The plant can be identified by its thick succulent-like leaves. All above ground parts of Purslane can be eaten: stems, leaves, flowers, buds, and seeds. Those parts can be consumed in almost every way you can imagine, raw or cooked, in a salad or in a sandwich. To read more about the Purslane plant, read our article Purslane, A Wild Edible Weed with Many Culinary Uses.

Health Benefits
Purslane can be a great addition to your daily diet. It’s packed with more omega-3 fatty acids than other the vast majority of other plants. It also contains a lot of essential vitamins and minerals. However, while it’s certainly a healthy ingredient, please be aware that Purslane contains oxalate. Oxalate has been linked to kidney stones. Consult a doctor before consuming vegetables with high oxalate content, such as Purslane and spinach.

Ingredients(Makes 6-7 cups)
½ cup Purslane leaves
6 cups hot water
1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons white wine
1 carrot, peeled and chopped
1 onion, roughly chopped
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
3 medium or large potatoes, peeled and halved
40g chourico, sliced
1/3 cup parboiled variety of rice
3 teaspoons coarse or sea salt
2 teaspoons pepper
juice from ½ lemon
½ teaspoon freshly ground cinnamon
10 fresh mint leaves (for serving)

Directions
In a large pot, heat butter and olive oil. Add in chopped onions and sauté until they’re softened and golden in color. Add in chourico and carrot, continue to sauté until fragrant. Then add in garlic and continue cooking until the garlic becomes fragrant.

Pour in the white wine and cook until almost completely evaporated. Add in the potatoes and season with salt and pepper. Toss and sauté for a couple more minutes.

Add in 6 cups of hot water and bring to a boil. Slightly lower the heat and cover the pot. Let the soup simmer on high for 20 minutes or so. Remove soup from heat.

Scoop out the potatoes and chourico slices, place them in separate bowls. Mash the potatoes roughly and set aside. Meanwhile, pour the soup into a blender or food processor and purée until completely smooth. Then, pour the soup back into the pot.

Add rice to the pot and boil. Using a wooden spoon, stir so the rice doesn’t stick. Cover the pot and let simmer for 10 minutes. Uncover, then add purslane and mashed potatoes. Bring to a boil and let simmer uncovered for 10 more minutes, or until the rice is just cooked. Stir occasionally. Lastly, add in cinnamon and the lemon juice. Stir until thoroughly mixed.

Remove from heat and scoop soup into bowls. Garnish with mint leaves on top and serve while hot.

 



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Visit our store by clicking on THIS LINK to get this t-Shirt which was designed exclusively for eattheplanet.org viewers which means it can not be purchased anywhere else on the internet. This shirt reads "Sassafras- The Radical Root". Our most popular article Sassafras, An Illegal Substance That Grows Wild In Our Back Yards inspired us to design this sassafras t-shirt
Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

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Chicory Root Tea Recipe With Cinnamon

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Chicory (Cichorium intybus) is a perennial herb plant. It can easily be recognized from its bright blue flowers and its dandelion-like leaves. Chicory is native to Europe, but it’s now commonly found across the US and Canada. All parts of the Chicory plant are edible. The leaves can be eaten raw or cooked and the flowers can be used as an edible salad garnish. Even the stems and roots can be used to make tea. However, Chicory tastes very bitter and it may help to blanch the root in water before consumption to help remove the bitter taste. To read more about the Chicory plant, see our article Chicory, Street Side Salad Greens and Tea.

Health Benefits
Chicory leaf or root tea is loaded with vitamins and minerals. It contains dietary fiber, vitamin A, B, C, E, K, and multiple minerals. It can be a great alternative to sugary or carbonated drinks. Without further ado, let’s move on to our Chicory tea recipe.

Ingredients (Makes 1 Cup)
2 tablespoons ground or chopped Chicory root
1 cup water
1 cinnamon stick (whole, not powdered)
1 tablespoon coconut oil
1 tablespoon honey or sweetener of your choice (optional)

Directions
Boil the water in a sauce pan.

In a tea kettle, put in Chicory root and the cinnamon stick. Pour the boiling water into the tea kettle. Cover the kettle and let the tea steep for 3 to 5 minutes.

Remove the cinnamon stick, then pour the tea into a blender along with the coconut oil. Blend the tea and oil on high for 15 to 30 seconds. Alternatively you can just strain out the chunks of root with a cheese cloth.

Pour the tea into a cup. Add in honey or other sweeteners of your choice, if you wish. Serve and enjoy while warm.



Celebrate our Most Popular Article With This Exclusive T-Shirt!!

Visit our store by clicking on THIS LINK to get this t-Shirt which was designed exclusively for eattheplanet.org viewers which means it can not be purchased anywhere else on the internet. This shirt reads "Sassafras- The Radical Root". Our most popular article Sassafras, An Illegal Substance That Grows Wild In Our Back Yards inspired us to design this sassafras t-shirt
Many of our readers find that subscribing to Eat The Planet is the best way to make sure they don't miss any of our valuable information about wild edibles.

Subscribe to our mailing list

our facebook page for additional articles and updates.

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